Rick Santorum Makes Shocking Claim On Racial, Religious Profiling

In the most recent Republican debate, Rick Santorum endorsed racial profiling to prevent terrorist attacks, specifying Muslims and younger men. Opponent Ron Paul expressed his disagreement with Santorum’s stance.

“Obviously, Muslims would be someone you look at, absolutely,” said former Pennsylvania senator Rick Santorum. “The radical Muslims are the people committing these crimes, by and large, with younger males” also deserving of more scrutiny at airport checkpoints.

Herman Cain said he was in favor of “targeted identification,” another way of saying some people look more suspicious than others. “If you take a look at the people who have tried to kill us it would be easy to identify what that profile looks like.” But when moderator Wolf Blitzer suggested that focusing on one sort of person would be like sngling out Christians or Jews, Cain rejected the premise as “simplifying.”

After Santorum noted that Muslims would be “your best candidates” for extra screening, the Texas congressman Ron Paul said, “What if they look like Timothy McVeigh?” referring to the white Christian ex-soldier convicted in 1995’s Oklahoma City bombing.

Racial & Religious profiling is not only wrong but also dangerous: Beware Of Unintended Consequences

The underlying assumption of the current terrorist profiling is dangerous, namely that young men of Muslim faith or Middle-Eastern appearance are particularly likely to be involved in terrorist activity. The result of this approach has been that a large number of totally innocent persons have been harassed and treated as suspects for no good reason.

The complexity of the terrorism situation worldwide and the constant development of terrorist aims and methods make it difficult to develop accurate profiles. Terrorist groups themselves are no doubt aware of such profiles and are targeting recruits who do not fit into the preconceived stereotypes.

Terrorist profiling may also be counter-productive. It tends to alienate and humiliate large sections of society. At the same time it “legitimizes” discrimination in the eyes of the general public in a most unfortunate manner. The result is that it divides society and pits the stigmatized group against the law enforcement agencies.

Related topic:

(1) Reality of Racial Profiling
Black males are incarcerated at roughly seven times the rate of white males.

(2) Racial Profiling After 9/11
Legal scholar Paul Butler examines four primary attitudes on racial profiling in post-9/11 America. Butler argues that proponents of racial profiling underestimate the costs of the practice, while overestimating the benefits. “It makes us feel more secure when we’re not.”

Complete video at FORA.TV

Racial profiling is an unspoken but pervasive problem throughout the United States. It stigmatises and criminalises people of colour from as early as their pre-teens, violating the rights and civil liberties of innocent people, and having devastating consequences on entire communities.

The Atlantic Philanthropies and The New Press invite you to join authors Michelle Alexander and Paul Butler and individuals who have experienced profiling firsthand for an illuminating conversation about this problem, and a discussion of what can be done about it. – The Atlantic Philanthropies

A former federal prosecutor, Paul Butler is the country’s leading expert on jury nullification. He provides legal commentary for CNN, NPR, and the Fox News Network, and has been featured on 60 Minutes and profiled in the Washington Post. He has written for the Post, the Boston Globe, and the Los Angeles Times, and is a law professor at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. Let’s Get Free: A Hip-Hop Theory of Justice is his first book.

Advertisements

About benvitalis

math grad - Interest: Number theory
This entry was posted in Culture, Politics and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s